Tag Archives: stolen elections

Green Party’s Jill Stein to the rescue with push for three-state recount

Updated below (on Friday, November 25, 2016)

Although on November 8 she garnered only around 1 percent of the presidential vote — and although she was shit and pissed upon mercilessly by the shameless, anti-democratic, Democrat-in-name-only, “feminist” Billarybots — two-time Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein (shown above) is pushing for a recount in three battleground Rust-Belt states that some experts say Billary Clinton might actually have won: Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. And thus far Stein has raised more than $4.3 million for the recount effort while Team Billary, of course, has done exactly nothing.

As has been reported for the past day or two or three, “A group of election lawyers and data experts has asked Hillary Clinton’s campaign to call for a recount of the vote totals in three battleground states — Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania — to ensure that a cyberattack was not committed to manipulate the totals.”

Deadlines for requesting — and paying for — recounts in these three states are quickly approaching, with Wisconsin’s deadline being tomorrow, according to The Associated Press.

Just as Al Gore essentially rolled over and played dead apparently in order to stay “above it all” (my words) in 2000 when George W. Bush & Co. blatantly stole the White House (with a deficit in the popular vote of more than 500,000), thus far Team Billary similarly pussily hasn’t requested any recount, of course (and the deficit in the popular vote this time thus far is more than 2 fucking million).

To the potential rescue has come Green Party candidate Jill Stein, who, although of course no recount will put her in the White House, has the standing to request recounts in these states because she appeared on their November 8 ballots.

It’s quite possible that the recounts will turn up nothing, but it wouldn’t be surprising if they turned up some surprising shit. Malfeasance or “innocent error” (my words) certainly would explain how the pussy-grabbing Donald J. Trump “beat” Billary Clinton in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania, when Wisconsin hadn’t gone to a Repugnican since 1984, Michigan hadn’t gone to a Repugnican since 1988, and ditto for Pennsylvania.

As of this writing, Stein has raised more than $4.3 million in donations for recount efforts in the three states.

Establishmentarians are scoffing, of course, because, just as we were supposed to do in 2000, we commoners are just supposed to shut the fuck up while the White House possibly has been stolen yet again. We’re certainly not supposed to point out that it’s possible that a presidential election still can be stolen, because such information is inconvenient and possibly even — gasp! — unsettling!

Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania together have 46 electoral votes. Should it turn out that Billary actually won them, that would boost her current electoral vote count from 232 to 278 — meaning that she, not Der Fuhrer Donald Trump, won the Electoral College.

Even if it turns out that just one of these three states actually has flipped to Billary, it it puts the entire presidential election into question (as if Billary’s 2-million-plus popular-vote lead hasn’t done that already!).

The recounts are worth it. At the very least, presumably they’d give us some degree of insight into how much we can — or cannot — trust our presidential elections.

I’ve given $20 to the recount effort; I encourage you to give to the effort too if you can.

Stein’s recount fundraising page right now says that the cost of the Wisconsin recount has been covered through the donations received thus far, and says that the recount request deadlines are tomorrow for Wisconsin, Monday for Pennsylvania, and Wednesday for Michigan.

This thing is worth a shot. Democracy — true, actual democracy — is worth it.*

Update (Friday, November 25, 2016): Politico reports that today Jill Stein filed her recount petition in Wisconsin.

Interestingly, though, the Politico writer, a Zach Montellaro, apparently can’t help himself from editorializing throughout his “reportage.” He notes that Stein “barely [made] the 5 p.m. EST deadline,” as though that were relevant (it would have been newsworthy had she missed the deadline), and he feels it important to note all of the fundraising webpage’s changes and updates, even though this (the plan to request a three-state recount) has been a rather fast-moving and quickly changing last-minute development — and even though it’s unprecedented, to my knowledge.

Montellaro also used this slanderous language in his “reportage”: “On the back of a debunked fear of election tampering in key swing states, the Green Party presidential candidate raised nearly $5 million to fund a recount effort.”

“Election tampering in key swing states” has not been debunked, not with actual physical evidence, and while Nate Silver’s fivethirtyeight.com widely has been quoted as having thrown cold water on the idea that some swing states’ reported vote totals are wrong, fivethirtyeight.com actually concluded thusly:

… It’s possible nonetheless that the election was hacked, in the sense that anything is possible. (And the best hackers are experts in erasing their tracks.)

Maybe hackers knew which control variables we’d look at and manipulated the vote in a way that it would look like it was caused by race, education and population driving different voting preferences.

Maybe hackers didn’t manipulate the share of votes in individual counties, but rather the turnout, increasing the number of votes in counties likely to favor one candidate or another.

Maybe some irregularities at the county level in early Wisconsin vote-counting are signs of wider problems. Maybe we’d find something if we dug down to the precinct level, or if we looked at other states with mixed voting systems.

But at a time when the number of voters without confidence in the accuracy of the vote count is rising, the burden of proof ought to be on people claiming there was electoral fraud.

The paradox is that in our current electoral system, without routine audits, seeking proof requires calling for a recount, which in itself can undermine confidence in the vote.

Fivethirtyeight.com got it right there until it totally pussed out at the end for whatever reason or reasons (knee-jerk, self-serving establishmentarianism, apparently, but who knows?).

“The burden of proof ought to be on people claiming there was electoral fraud,” but when they don’t have access to the voting system equipment, computers, ballots, etc. — which are in the sole possession of local governmental entities — how, exactly, can they prove their allegations without being in possession of the physical evidence?

And which is more important: “confidence in the accuracy of the vote count” (which easily could be just blind confidence) or a good reason to have confidence in the vote?

There apparently is a widespread belief (which has persisted at least since the 2000 theft of the White House) that it’s more important to have quick election results that aren’t questioned — you know, so that we don’t “undermine confidence in the vote” — than that we have election results that are accurate, and that’s incredibly fucked up.

Anyway, again, the subtext of Politico’s Montellaro’s “reportage” is to cast aspersions upon Stein, apparently. Among other things, he snidely notes that much of the money that Stein has been raising — more than $5.2 million thus far, per Stein’s recount fundraising webpage as I type this sentence — will go toward lawyers’ fees, as though it were Stein’s fault that you need lawyers to handle this shit and that lawyers, always the opportunists, frequently go on their legal-fee feeding frenzies.

I just gave another donation to the recount effort. That’s what unfair, hypocritical, usually establishmentarian attacks on people who have courage and who are trying to do the right thing often spur me to do.

P.S. Politico does make one interesting, fairly newsworthy note, which it saves for the very last paragraph; it reports that Jill Stein has raised more money for the three-state recount than she raised for her 2016 presidential bid.

I mean, that’s interesting. How relevant it is I’m not sure, but it’s interesting.

But it’s also interesting that enough people have questioned the “official” November 8 presidential election results that thus far they have donated more than $5 million to have the votes in three swing/Rust-Belt states recounted — and that they have done this outside of the partisan duopoly of the Coke Party and the Pepsi Party. (On that note, it recently was reported on MSNBC that the Obama White House encouraged Billary Clinton to concede to Donald Trump quickly you know, in order to avoid ugliness, because, you know, it’s more important to avoid ugliness and to remain “above it all” than it is to have elections in which the winners, and not the losers, actually take office.)

Again: Democracy is worth it; $5 million is chump change toward what election integrity is worth.

Anyone who has read me for the past year-plus knows that I’m no fan of Billary Clinton, but while Team Billary and the Billarybots totally fucked Bernie Sanders out of the party’s presidential nomination, the fact remains that on November 8 Billary Clinton indisputably won the popular vote by a huge margin, and Trump’s reported wins in the traditionally Democratic Rust-Belt states look suspicious enough to double check.

*Jill Stein’s fundraising webpage for the recount effort gives this important background information:

In 2004, the Cobb/LaMarche [Green Party presidential] campaign demanded a recount in Ohio. Because of their efforts, an election administrator went to jail. We also exposed the profound problems with DRE machines [link is mine], which helped launch an election integrity movement. That provoked California to engage in a “top-to-bottom” review of [its] voting system, which culminated in the abolition of DRE machines.

The Green Party Platform calls for “publicly-owned, open source voting equipment and deploy it across the nation to ensure high national standards, performance, transparency and accountability; use verifiable paper ballots; and institute mandatory automatic random precinct recounts to ensure a high level of accuracy in election results.”

Election integrity experts have independently identified Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin as states where “statistical anomalies” raised concerns. Our effort to recount votes in those states is not intended to help Hillary Clinton.

These recounts are part of an election integrity movement to attempt to shine a light on just how untrustworthy the U.S. election system is. [Emphasis is mine.]

All money raised goes toward recounts in Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. We hope to do recounts in all three states. If we only raise sufficient money for two, we will demand recounts in two states. If we only raise enough money for one, we will demand a recount in one state.

We cannot guarantee a recount will happen in any of these states we are targeting. We can only pledge we will demand recounts in those states.

If we raise more than what’s needed, the surplus will also go toward election integrity efforts and to promote voting system reform.

Here are the filing fees and deadlines for each state:

  • Wisconsin: $1.1 million by November 25 [tomorrow]
  • Pennsylvania: $0.5 million by November 28 [Monday]
  • Michigan: $0.6 million by November 30 [Wednesday]

Those are filing fees alone. The costs associated with recounts are a function of state law. Attorney’s fees are likely to be another $2 million to $3 million, [and] then there are the costs of the statewide recount observers in all three states. The total cost is likely to be $6 million to $7 million. …


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Can Eddie Munster save Mittens?

Repugnican Tea Party vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan said in 2005, “The reason I got involved in public service, by and large, if I had to credit one thinker, one person, it would be Ayn Rand,” who was insane and sociopathically selfish and cold-blooded and heartless – and thus she is the social Darwinists’ goddess. In 2003, Ryan remarked that he’d given copies of Rand’s seminal novel extolling selfishness, Atlas Shrugged, as Christmas gifts to his congressional staffers. Now when he is asked about Ayn Rand, Ryan essentially responds: “Ayn who?”

For months, President Barack Obama and Repugnican Tea Party presidential wannabe Mittens Romney remained too close for comfort in nationwide polls, with usually both of them polling at 40-something percent, and usually with Obama ahead, but only within a few percentage points.

Then, something happened: Late last month, Mittens put himself out there, fairly big-time, on the world stage, visiting London, Israel and then Poland. His Rainbow Tour was widely considered, all in all, a gaffe-filled failure.

After that debacle, the nationwide poll numbers did something that they hadn’t done in months: they moved.

A Reuters/Ipsos poll taken August 2 through August 6 put Obama seven points above Mittens, 49 percent to 42 percent.

Even a Faux “News” poll taken August 5 through August 7 put Obama nine points above Mittens, 49 percent to 40 percent.

A CNN/ORC poll taken August 7 and 8 put Obama seven points above Mittens, 52 percent to 45 percent — which is about what I expect the popular vote to be in November. (In 2008, Obama won 52.9 percent of the popular vote to John McCainosaurus’ 45.7 percent. I expect Mittens to get no more than 47 percent or 48 percent in November and Obama to get around 51 percent or 52 percent.)

The more that the voters get to know Mittens, the less they want to vote for him, so what to do?

Haul out Pretty Boy Paul Ryan!

What a dreamboat! That smile! Those baby blues! That boyish laugh! Who cares if he is pure, raw, unadulterated evil wrapped in a pretty package?

Actually, a lot of people, I surmise.

I don’t expect Paul Ryan to be much more of a boost to Mittens than Sarah Palin was to McCainosaurus.

Ryan probably isn’t as catastrophic a choice as Palin was, but is Ryan ready to be president should Mittens die and go wherever dead Mormons go after death?

I don’t fucking think so.

Mittens would be an awful president, and Ryan probably would be even worse.

I’ve seen articles on the Internet asserting that in Paul Ryan, Mittens picked his “opposite,” but no, Mittens and Boy Wonder are much more alike than they are different. Both of them are fucking mega-phonies who want to stick it to the poor and the middle class and the working class for the benefit of their fellow plutocrats while they smile at and whisper sweet nothings to us.

Mittens, a Mormon, and Ryan, a Roman Catholic, both call themselves “Christians” when their No. 1 goal is to make the filthy rich even filthier rich and the poorest among us even dirt poorer — despite Jesus Christ’s No. 1 teaching to treat and to love others as we want others to treat and to love us.

Mittens and his Boy Wonder also are the faces of the historical oppression of the rest of us by right-wing white men at a time when historically oppressed groups have more political power than they have had at any other time in the nation’s history. (In that respect, actually, it’s possible, I suppose, that when all is said and done, it generally will be recognized that Sarah Palin was a better choice than was Paul Ryan.)

The only way that I can see the Romney/Ryan ticket winning in November is if the democracy-hating Repugnican Tea Party traitors succeed in their plan to suppress enough Democratic voters to be able to steal the election, as George W. Bush, Jeb Bush, Katherine Harris & Co. did in 2000. (Recall that Bush in 2000 lost the popular vote by more than a half-million votes to Al Gore but was then coronated as president by the right-wing, vote-count-halting U.S. Supreme Court.)

But even a Romney/Ryan “win” in November might not, in the end, be for the worst.

A second stolen presidential election by two neo-Nazis who are determined to make all of us serfs might, just might, be enough of a tipping point to spark our long-overdue revolution against our plutocratic/feudal overlords.

P.S. I predict that the announcement of Paul Ryan as Mittens’ running mate will give Romney a boost of no more than two or three percentage points in the polls that we’ll see over the next two or three weeks. I expect Obama in nationwide polls to maintain a lead above the margin of error — that is, at least four percentage points — from here all the way through Election Day.

While the white supremacist “tea party” traitors never have been crazy about Mittens, they really want to get the black guy out of the White House, and the Mittensmobile has been their only vehicle to that goal, so the vast majority of them already have been captured in the presidential polling, I surmise.

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Democracy begins at home

So the debate continues on whether or not Iran’s presidential election on Friday was rigged.

My guess is that it was — since Iran is a theocracy and the theocrat in chief wanted Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to remain as Iran’s president — but by how much, who knows?

I consider the source when I see news accounts of the likes of hawkish Repugnican John “Bomb, Bomb, Bomb, Bomb, Bomb Iran” McCainosaurus and hawkish former Bush regime ambassador John “I Am the Walrus” Bolton claiming that of course Iran’s election was stolen. They want Iran wiped off of the map as much as Iranian hardliners want Israel wiped off of the map, so I discount their rantings and ravings.

I found one Politico article titled “Ahmadinejad Won; Get Over It” to be interesting. The authors make a rather compelling argument that Ahmadinejad has much more popular support within Iran that is commonly discussed in the Western media.

My stance, from all of the viewpoints and all of the news stories that I’ve read, is that no one really knows what happened in Iran. Thankfully, the Obama administration, although pressured by the Israel-first lobby and the warhawks and the war profiteers to declare Iran’s election invalid, has taken a fairly balanced approach thus far, declaring that the election results look fishy but that right now all that we Americans can say about the election is that we just don’t know.

But what I find most interesting and frustrating about the discussion of the validity of Iran’s presidential election is that although there were serious concerns among democracy-lovers about presidential election irregularies in the pivotal state of Ohio in November 2004 — so much so that only for the second time in the nation’s history, a U.S. senator (Barbara Boxer) joined a U.S. representative in filing a Congressional objection to the certification of a state’s Electoral College votes — the debacle in Ohio in 2004 was swept under the red, white and blue rug.

And don’t even get me started on the obviously stolen U.S. presidential election of 2000. And if George W. Bush never was elected legitimately in the first place — and he never was — then there is no way that his “re-election” could have had any legitimacy, either.

Americans are all too eager to scream “election fraud!” at Iran — even though Iran, along with Iraq and North Korea, comprised the hawkish, unelected Bush regime’s “Axis of Evil,” so it’s not like the U.S. government could be objective about Iran, which it already has declared its enemy — but Americans are not willing to ensure that their elections at home aren’t rigged.  

Democracy begins at home.


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Americans are in no position to lecture others on stolen presidential elections

Smoke billows from a burning bus as a supporter of Mir Hossein ...

A supporter of Mir Hossein Mousavi hurls a stone at riot police ...

Supporters of Iran's moderate presidential candidate Mirhossein ...

Supporters of Iran's moderate presidential candidate Mirhossein ...

A supporter of Iran's moderate presidential candidate Mirhossein ...

AFP and Reuters photos

You won’t see this at home: An opponent of Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad flashes a “V” for “victory” sign with a burning bus as his backdrop in Tehran, and other anti-Ahmadinejad protesters hurl rocks at riot police in Tehran. There were no such demonstrations of love for true democracy in the United States of Amnesia after the Bush regime stole two presidential elections in a row and launched a bogus war that has cost thousands and thousands of lives and billions and billions of dollars. Yes, the American sheeple have been quite tamed, rendered quite harmless.

“Ahmadinejad Re-elected Under Cloud of Fraud,” the Salon.com article by Middle East expert Juan Cole is titled. While I wouldn’t expect a mention in the headline that George W. Bush was “re-elected” under a cloud of fraud in 2004, it would have been nice to have seen a mention somewhere in the article following the headline that the United States of Amnesia is in no position to lecture any other nation about stolen presidential elections.

Don’t get me wrong. If I had to put money on it one way or the other, I would put my money on Iran’s election having been stolen. I’m no expert on Iran, but my understanding of Iran — which Cole’s article, assuming that it is accurate, reinforces — is that it is a theocratically totalitarian nation, which makes “democracy” there just a show.

But the United States of America long has been a corporatocracy/plutocracy, under which “democracy” often if not usually is just a show.

Just as the clerics in Iran really pull the strings, it’s those with the big bucks in the pay-to-play United States who really pull the strings. In both nations, it seems, elections are dog and pony shows meant to give the masses the illusion that the majority of the people actually are, as former “President” Bush might put it, the deciders.

Americans delude themselves over how much freedom and democracy they truly have. We have friendly fascism here in the United States. You aren’t physically forced or tortured or enslaved here; here you economically are forced/coerced and tortured and enslaved, so to speak. (And you are lulled to sleep by such things as endless mindless television, mountains of junk food and cigarettes and alcohol and pharmaceuticals meant to numb you and to enrich the corporations that manufacture them, and a perpetual parade of consumer goods that you don’t need but that you desperately want nonetheless.) But we American commoners are controlled just as effectively as are the masses in Iran; make no mistake about it.

Actually, the American sheeple apparently are better controlled by their plutocratic/corporatist overlords than the Iranians are controlled by their theocratic overlords, as evidenced by the fact that when the Bush regime stole a presidential election not once, but twice, nary a single brick or large rock was thrown through a single store-front window, to my knowledge. In Iran, however, the people have been rioting for two days now over Iran’s apparently stolen presidential election.

Reports The Associated Press today:

TEHRAN, Iran – Protesters set fires and smashed store windows [today] in a second day of violence as groups challenging President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s re-election tried to keep pressure on authorities. Anti-riot police lashed back and the regime blocked Internet sites used to rally the pro-reform campaign.

Ahmadinejad dismissed the unrest — the worst in a decade in Tehran — as “not important.” He said Friday’s vote was “real and free” and insisted the results showing his landslide victory were fair and legitimate. Along Tehran’s Vali Asr street — where activists supporting rival candidate Mir Hossein Mousavi held a huge pre-election rally last week — tens of thousands marched in support of Ahmadinejad, waving Iranian flags and shouting his name.

Mousavi released his first statement since two days of violent protests began, calling on authorities to cancel the election. He said that is the only way to restore public trust. Mousavi, who has accused authorities of election fraud, urged his supporters to continue their “civil and lawful” opposition to the results and advised police to stop violence against protesters. He has claimed he was the true winner of the election.

The violence spilling from the disputed results has pushed Iran’s Islamic establishment to respond with sweeping measures that include deploying anti-riot squads around the capital and cutting mobile phone messaging and Internet sites used by the Mousavi’s campaign.

There’s little chance that the youth-driven movement could immediately threaten the pillars of power in Iran — the ruling clerics and the vast network of military and intelligence forces at their command — but it raises the possibility that a sustained and growing backlash could complicate Iran’s policies at a pivotal time….

So far, Mousavi has issued mixed signals through his website before it was shut down. He urged for calm but also said he is the legitimate winner of Friday’s election and called on supporters to reject a government of “lies and dictatorship.” He has not been seen in public since a news conference shortly after polls closed.

In a second day of clashes, scores of young people shouted “Death to the dictator!” and broke the windows of city buses on several streets in central Tehran. They have burned banks, trash bins and piles of tires used as flaming barricades to block police.

Riot police beat some of the protesters with batons while dozens of others holding shields and motorcycles stood guard nearby. Shops, government offices and businesses closed early as tension mounted.

In a news conference, Ahmadinejad called the level of violence “not important from my point of view” and likened it to the intensity after a soccer match….

About a mile away from Ahmadinejad’s news conference, young Iranians set trash bins, banks and tires on fire as riot police beat them back with batons….

[Yesterday] Mousavi, a 67-year-old former prime minister, released [an Internet] message saying he would not “surrender to this manipulation.” Authorities responded with targeted detentions, apparently designed to rattle the leadership of Mousavi’s “green” movement — the trademark color of his campaign….

Mousavi’s newspaper, Kalemeh Sabz, or the Green Word, did not appear on newsstands [today]. An editor, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the situation, said the paper never left the printing house because authorities were upset with Mousavi’s statements….

Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, closed the door for possible compromise. He could have used his near-limitless powers to intervene in the election dispute. But, in a message on state TV on [yesterday], he urged the nation to unite behind Ahmadinejad, calling the result a “divine assessment.”

Again, democracy in Iran apparently is just a show, when, in fact, the clerics pull all of the strings. In his Salon.com article, Cole notes, “With the backing of the clerical supreme leader, Ahmadinejad’s victory is unassailable in the theocratic Iranian system, where Shiite clerics hold ultimate power.”

Of course, “democracy” in Saudi Arabia is just a show, too, with the monarchy there pulling all of the strings, but for some oily reason the U.S. government accepts monarchy in Saudi Arabia but demands democracy for certain other Middle Eastern nations.

The rioting in Iran indicates to me that a good number of Iranians are passionate about true democracy, a passion that my fellow Americans lost long ago, as evidenced by the fact that today my fellow Americans are willing to accept such unacceptable things as stolen presidential elections and the launching of bogus wars for the war profiteers, with nary a tire burned or a store-front window smashed.

We Americans do participate from time to time in peaceful protests, such as the “Not My President Day” rally on Presidents’ Day in which I participated at the California State Capitol in early 2001, and the anti-war rally that I attended there shortly before the unelected Bush regime launched its bogus Vietraq War in March 2003, but the thing about peaceful demonstrations is that, being peaceful, the powers that be are able to simply ignore them. Which they do.

P.S. I have to note that I find this Associated Press news photo from today

Protestors shout slogans as about 250 demonstrators turned out ...

(caption here) to be pretty fucking poignant, because it was at the “Not My President Day” rally here in Sacramento in early 2001 that I held a homemade sign that read “George Dubious Bush is not MY president!” — and I see that a young Iranian woman in The Hague, Netherlands, displayed a very similar sign about Ahmadinejad during a protest there today…

To this day I consider George W. Bush’s presidency to have been illegitimate, and I never could write “President” Bush without the quotation marks, because to have done so would have been to give him the legitimacy that he never possessed.

Finally, I have to wonder if the “green revolution” in Iran has any connection to the international Green Party, if the green theme was intentional on the part of Mousavi and his supporters or if it is a coincidence… I’m a Green at heart.


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