Tag Archives: Sen. Bernie Sanders

While Bernie surges, Billary slips below 50 percent nationally and in Iowa

Presidential aspirant U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders has work to do on becoming better known by more Americans, but more of those who know Sanders like him than dislike him. Billary “Coronate Me Already” Clinton, on the other hand, is quite well-known, but more than 50 percent of Americans dislike her. Yet we’re to believe that she’s the stronger general-election presidential candidate.

A third recent nationwide poll (I recently reported on the first two) has put Billary Clinton’s nationwide support among Democrats and Democratic leaners at below 50 percent — and has shown that such support for her dropped by 10 percentage points in just one month, from last month to this month.

And perhaps more devastatingly, a recent poll of likely Iowa caucus-goers also, for the first time, has put Billary at below 50 percent.

A Quinnipiac University poll taken August 20-25 put Billary’s support from her own party and its sympathizers at 45 percent nationally.

If 45 percent seems pretty good to you, note that a similar Quinnipiac University poll taken in April put Billary at 60 percent nationally. And the August 20-25 Quinnipiac University poll, like the other two recent nationwide polls that I wrote about earlier this month, also shows that Billary experienced a 10-point drop in support from just July to August; a July 23-28 Quinnipiac University poll had put Billary at 55 percent.

That’s three recent, independent nationwide polls whose results are quite close. The three polls have Billary’s nationwide support averaging at 47 percent, and Bernie Sander’s nationwide support averaging at 27 percent.

Democratic socialist Sanders wasn’t supposed to be doing this well against Queen Billary, who began running for president when her mother pushed her out 67 years ago.

That Billary’s support from those within her own party plummeted 10 points in just the past month demonstrates that the more people hear about her and get to know her, the less they like her. And we have more than five full months to go before the first-in-the-nation states of Iowa and New Hampshire hold their caucuses and primary election (on February 1 and on February 9, respectively).

Speaking of which, a Bloomberg Politics/Des Moines Register Iowa Poll released yesterday shows that Billary has the support of only 37 percent of likely Iowa caucus-goers — the first time that Billary’s support has been below 50 percent in the poll — and that Bernie Sanders is right on her heels, with the support of 30 percent of likely caucus-goers. (In May, Billary was at 57 percent in the poll and Sanders was at only 16 percent.)

Bloomberg News reports: “‘It looks like what people call the era of inevitability is over,’ said J. Ann Selzer, president of West Des Moines, Iowa-based Selzer & Co., which conducted the poll. ‘She has lost a third of the support that she had in May, so any time you lose that much that quickly, it’s a wake-up call.'”

But Billary won’t wake up.

Instead, she’s giving us a repeat performance of her doomed 2008 bid for the Democratic Party presidential nomination, when she acted like the cocky hare who already had it in the bag and thus lost to the slow-and-steady-wins-the-race, tortoise-like Team Obama.

Billary has tried to assure the Demo-rats who are fleeing the sinking USS Billary — which awfully resembles the RMS Titanicthat she essentially has won already, before a single caucus has been held or a single primary election ballot has been cast, because of the “superdelegate” commitments that she already has (never mind that those too-early commitments easily can be broken — and that they would be, that they would evaporate after it were clear that the voters don’t want Hillary after all).

With Bernie Sanders within striking distance of Billary in Iowa (given that the caucuses are more than five full months away) according to the latest poll, and with him already beating Billary in the latest poll of likely New Hampshire primary voters (by 7 percentage points*), I expect Bernie to win New Hampshire and quite possibly Iowa, too.

I don’t see Billary recovering from losing both Iowa and New Hampshire to party outsider and democratic socialist Bernie Sanders. (He always has caucused with the Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives and in the U.S. Senate, so he’s not entirely an outsider, but still, compared to the center-right Clintons, who with their political machine turned the Democratic Party into the Repugnican Lite Party, he very much is an outsider.)

We saw what Billary did in 2008 when she was losing to upstart and political rock star Barack Obama and increasingly was desperate: She bolted to the right, dubbing Obama an “out-of-touch” “elitist.” But this Clintonesque triangulation bullshit hurt her more than it helped her — obviously, since Obama beat her — as those who participate in caucuses and primary elections (a.k.a. your base) aren’t the centrist fucktards to whom the Clinton Dynasty always has tried to appeal.

I see Billary & Co. savaging Bernie Sanders especially should he win both Iowa and New Hampshire, and Team Billary’s attacks on Sanders would make Billary even more loathed than she already is.

Especially since Bernie Sanders decided early on not to attack DINO Billary Clinton** — although he has plenty of material with which to do so — Team Billary’s attacks on Bernie would backfire big-time.

When someone who already is not well-liked (two recent nationwide polls put Billary’s unfavorability among all Americans at more than 50 percent and her nationwide favorability well below 50 percent) savages someone who has not savaged anyone else and who generally is liked, it usually doesn’t work out very well for the attacker.***

*Sanders beat Billary in the last three polls of New Hampshirites, with a 7-percent lead over Billary in the last two polls.

**My best guess, and my understanding, is that it’s Bernie Sanders’ personality and personal belief system that prevent him from attacking Billary, and while I personally have questioned whether or not it’s politically wise for him not to attack Billary, my best guess is that in the end his political pacifism will have helped him politically much more than it will have harmed him.

In short, he knows what he is doing, as evidenced by the fact that what he is doing is working; he surges on.

***Bernie Sanders’ favorability ratings in two recent nationwide polls show that, unlike is the case with Billary, more like him than not, but that many don’t know him well enough to have an opinion of him.

He has a lot of work to do on that (we have a lot of work to do on that), to be sure, but it’s better to be like Sanders (unknown by many Americans but liked by a majority of those who do know you) than it is to be like Billary: quite-well-known and disliked by a majority of Americans.

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Bernie Sanders for President 2016 (thus far, anyway)

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., center, joined by Congressional Democrats, and others, speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Monday, Sept. 8, 2014, calling for an amendment to the Constitution aimed at curbing special interests' financial clout in elections. From left are, Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen, Margery F. Baker, executive vice president for policy and program at People for the American Way, Sen. Tom Udall, D-N.M., Sanders, Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse, D-R.I., Rep. Ted Deutch, D-Fla., and Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn. Members of the Senate and the House of Representatives return to Capitol Hill today after a five-week vacation. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Associated Press photo

Progressive U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, probable 2016 presidential candidate, speaks at a news conference in Washington, D.C., earlier this month geared toward overturning the right-wing U.S. Supreme Court’s disastrous Citizens United decision, which declared that corporations are people and as such have the “First-Amendment” right to spend lavishly on political candidates who will do their bidding.

Independent/democratic socialist U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont is the sole individual on the planet who thus far has raised the prospect of running as an actually progressive presidential candidate against pseudo-progressive/Democrat in name only Billary Clinton. (It’s not about Billary, he has claimed, but oh, methinks, ’tis.)

“A, I don’t know if Hillary Clinton is running, and B, I don’t know what she is running on,” Sanders said on “Meet the Press” yesterday. “But this is what I do know: I know the middle class in this country is collapsing. I know the gap between the very, very rich and everybody else is growing wider. I know there is profound anger at the greed on Wall Street, anger at corporate America, anger at the political establishment — and anger, by the way, at the media establishment. The American people want real change, and I’ve been taking on the big-money interests and special interests all of my political life.

“The issue,” Sanders added, “is not Hillary Clinton.” But since Sanders’ actually progressive agenda is antithetical to Billary’s actual agenda – whether she’ll cop to possessing her actual center-right, pro-plutocratic, pro-corporate, pro-Wall-Street-weasel, pro-military-industrial-complex agenda or not – it is about Billary.

I’m fine with having our first female president, but I don’t want just any female president, just so that we can say that we finally have had our first female president. We’ve been there, done that with our first black president, haven’t we?

I want a progressive president. The other demographics – skin tone, the possession of ovaries or testes, age, religion, etc. – I don’t much give a flying fuck about. I’m a gay man, and sure, from a purely selfish, tribalistic standpoint I suppose that it would be great to have our first openly gay male president (and if he is married, perhaps our first First Husband in the White House, too), but if he were a wingnut or even a so-called “centrist” or “moderate” (translation: sellout), no thanks; give me the actually progressive heterosexual president instead, hands down.

I’d be fine with Democratic U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Masschusetts as our first female president, but although she put a book out not long ago, she seems unlikely, to me, to run against Billary in 2016.

That’s because the unspoken but very understood rule within the Democratic Party establishment is that you don’t run against Billary, even though she has zero charisma, zero accomplishments, and her unlikeability (under which falls her apparent inability to generate an iota of actual human warmth) means that she’d be a risky candidate to put up against the Repugnican Tea Party not only in 2016, but in any presidential election year. (Besides, as I have noted, Billary acts like a Repugnican Lite, and why would the voters choose Repugnican Lite when they can vote for an actual, full-bodied Repugnican?)

After seeing Barack Obama’s ubiquitous promises of “hope” and “change” crash and burn, my bet is that the voters are hungry, starving, for an actually progressive Democratic — that is, real Democratic — presidential candidate right about now.

For millions of actual progressives like me, if we’re going to just coronate Queen Billary already, there is no reason whatsoever for me to pay attention or to become involved in the 2016 presidential race in any way (except, of course, to blog about how awful Billary is). That “At least Billary isn’t a Repugnican!” isn’t an effective talking point for the Democrats anymore, because she essentially is a Repugnican. She ran to the right of Obama in 2008 and she’s running to the right of him again — and he’s already right of center.

And I truly want a truly progressive candidate to win the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination. No, I don’t just want Billary to be forced by a progressive/actually Democratic challenger, during the upcoming presidential primary season, to pretend to be the populist that she never has been and never will be, only to go on to the White House to govern like her husband did or like Obama has: as a Democrat in name only, driving yet another nail in the coffin of the Democratic Party. I want Billary “Crown Me Already!” Clinton to be denied the Democratic Party presidential nomination in 2016 just as she was in 2008. I want her pathetic, sorry, right-wing, self-serving, pro-plutocratic ass to be defeated once again. (Again, though, should she emerge as the 2016 Democratic presidential candidate, I can see the Repugnican candidate beating her.)

Bernie Sanders stated yesterday that he’s still considering which course of action would be better for him, should he decide to run for president for 2016 (and it sounds to me like he already has decided that he will): to run on the Democratic Party ticket (although he isn’t a Democrat, as an independent/democratic socialist he always has caucused with the Democrats in D.C. [what other choice has he really had?]) or to run on an independent ticket, a la Ralph Nader.

Given the uphill battle of running as an independent presidential candidate in all 50 states, it seems to me that Sanders would run as a Democrat.

Either way, if it comes down to Bernie or Billary, I’m going with Bernie.

No way in hell am I going to hold my nose and suppress my gag reflex while I cast a vote for Billary Clinton. I want to feel good (not guilty and dirty) about my vote, and I would feel great voting for Bernie Sanders — hell, if for no other reason than that for a long time now, it has looked as though no one else left of center would have the cajones to challenge Queen Billary in 2016, with the conventional thinking being that because she came in at second place in 2008, 2016 automatically is rightfully all hers.

A run for the White House by Sanders — especially as a Democrat, but again, I would support him as an independent — would represent to me a glimmer of hope, the possibility that the teeny-tiny ember that is all that is left of what the Democratic Party used to be still, even at this late hour, even after what Bill Clinton (with Billary) and what Barack Obama have done to the party, can be stoked to its once-flaming glory.

P.S. A Bernie Sanders-Elizabeth Warren or Warren-Sanders ticket would, I think, be my dream ticket for 2016. And I’d still entertain a return to the presidential arena by Howard Dean, although that seems unlikely.

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