Tag Archives: celebrity

Just say Noprah!

Barack Obama in large part started out like this: He gave a speech at the 2004 Democratic Party National Convention that a lot of people liked, and in no tiny part because of that single speech, he was made president of the United States of America after he hadn’t even completed a full six-year term in the U.S. Senate.

Now, billionaire celebrity Oprah Winfrey makes a speech that a lot of people like, and there is clamor for her to be president.

Just: No.

You’d think that by now we’d have learned our lesson about how smart it is to put a billionaire TV celebrity who’s never held any elected office into the White House, but Americans never fucking learn.

Of course Winfrey very probably would do a better job than “President” Pussygrabber is doing. But who wouldn’t?

You wouldn’t want your surgeon or even your veterinarian or even your car mechanic to have had no prior experience for the job, so why the fuck would you not demand that the person holding the most powerful job not only in the nation, but probably also in the world, have had some previous experience navigating Washington, D.C.?

What the fucking fuck?

Remember “President Dwayne Elizondo Mountain Dew Herbert Camacho” from the movie “Idiocracy”? He was a wrestler and porn star before he ascended to the Oval office. Here he is at a State of the Union address:

We’re already terrifyingly close to that with “President” Pussygrabber, but we have time to reverse course.

One fucking touching speech does not make a good president of the United States of America. Barack “Hope and Change” Obama, who unnecessarily lost the House of Representatives in November 2010 because he squandered his shitload of political capital in 2009 and 2010 and who thus was hamstrung for the final six fucking years of his eight-year presidency, is proof enough of that.

A boring-ass person who is progressive and who knows D.C. — like this guy:

— makes a good president.

I cast no aspersions on Oprah Winfrey’s intelligence or her leadership abilities. And I’m fine with a black woman being president — if she is qualified for the job.

But I went in blind when I voted for Obama in 2008 — yes, I more or less bought the viral “hope” and “change” bullshit, and I regret it — and right now we have a billionaire TV celebrity in the Oval Office, and every fucking day he makes it crystal fucking clear how important previous experience in elected governance at the federal level is to be POTUS. (Obama’s previous experience in D.C. of only four years was not enough experience, I believe his milquetoast-at-best presidency amply proved.)

I hope that President Oprah fever subsides quickly. I can’t vote for her, and should she actually emerge as the 2020 Democratic Party presidential candidate, I’ll remain an independent.

I want to return my party registration to the Democratic Party, but I can do so only when and if the party earns my loyalty and respect, and looking to billionaire TV celebrities instead of to experienced elected officials to fill the presidency isn’t the pathway there.

The United States of America is at the precipice on many fronts, and we cannot afford to take another chance on yet another unknown quantity occupying the Oval Office.

Just say Noprah.

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Edward Snowden is the person of the year

White House, lawmakers: no clemency for Snowden

Associated Press image

Whistleblower and protester Edward Snowden is shown in a video grab from September in Moscow, where he had to flee in order to avoid political persecution and prosecution in the lawless United States of America. You can vote for Snowden for TIME magazine’s “Person of the Year” for 2013 by clicking here.

So TIME magazine is taking online votes for its next “Person of the Year.” You have 42 candidates to choose from (giving the candidates only a “yes” or “no” vote), knowing that TIME’s editors will make the final decision, regardless of how the online polling goes — of which I’m glad, since Miley Cyrus leads the online polling as I type this sentence. (Whether people sincerely want her or whether the votes for her are part of a campaign, as a joke, I’m not certain.)

The 42 candidates include the famous and the infamous, including (in no certain order) Russian President Vladimir Putin, Pope Francis, the Koch brothers, the Tsarnaev brothers (the brothers accused of having perpetrated the Boston Marathon bombing), Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Angelina Jolie, and, of course, Barack Obama.

(Historically, the president of the United States has been named TIME’s “Person of the Year” about once every three years on average, for fuck’s sake. With the sole exception of Gerald Ford, every U.S. president since Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who was named “Person of the Year” three times, has been named “Person of the Year” at least once. Two-term presidents Ronald Reagan, Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Obama all were named “Personal of the Year” twice, so pretty much if you are the U.S. president, you’re named TIME’s “Person of the Year” at least once a term [as long as you’re not Gerald Ford…].)

TIME’s “Person of the Year” is to go to the individual who was most influential on the world stage (or at least on the American stage…), for good or for ill.

My vote for 2013’s “Person of the Year,” hands down, is for patriot Edward Snowden, who revealed to the world how much we have been spied upon illegally by the U.S. government. As I type this sentence, Snowden is the third-most popular candidate for “Person of the Year” in TIME’s online polling.

My other favorites for 2013’s “Person of the Year” include Texas pol (and, hopefully, future Texas governor) Wendy Davis (who thus far is at No. 5 in the online polling) and Edith Windsor, whose lawsuit brought about the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling that the so-called “Defense of Marriage Act” (“DOMA”) is unconstitutional (since it is — or was, anyway).

However, Edward Snowden has had truly global significance and influence. Indeed, the United Nations next month is to consider a resolution that states “that surveillance and data interception by governments and companies ‘may violate or abuse human rights.’”

Snowden’s “crime” is that he has embarrassed the elites who unconstitutionally and illegally have spied upon Americans and others — they have directly spied illegally or they have aided and abetted such illegal spying — but which is worse: committing the crimes in the first fucking place or exposing the crimes that others have committed?

Um, yeah: The later is called “whistleblowing,” and since 2002’s “Person[s] of the Year” were “The Whistleblowers,” and since 2011’s “Person of the Year” was “The Protester,” there certainly is precedent for Edward Snowden being named TIME’s “Person of the Year” for 2013.

P.S. Since I composed the above, I read on the Los Angeles Times’ website that “A team of hackers claims it found a way to rig the [TIME magazine “Person of the Year”] poll (users are required to vote through Twitter or Facebook),” but the Times charitably adds immediately: “But Cyrus has spent the better part of the year leading the chatter on the place that matters most these days: the Internet.”

My guess is that hackers indeed were involved in putting Cyrus at No. 1, which gives me more hope for the nation…

If hackers indeed put Cyrus at No. 1, then maybe Snowden actually is in the top two, although I would think that hackers might have the desire to help Snowden out, too…

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized