Tag Archives: campaign contributions

‘Vast majority’ of ’08 donors haven’t ponied up for Obama’s re-election bid

The New York Times ran an interesting article yesterday that reports that “a vast majority of [President Barack] Obama’s past donors, who number close to four million, have not yet given him any money at all [for his re-election bid].”

Wow.

The Times also reports that

Through June 30, the close of the most recent campaign reporting period, more than 552,000 people had contributed to Mr. Obama’s re-election effort, according to campaign officials. Half of them were new donors, and nearly all of them gave contributions of less than $250.

This doesn’t require a shitload of analysis — just a little bit of awareness. Obama burned those to whom he repeatedly had promised “hope” and “change,” and, according to the Times, about half of his current donors are newbies. (I surmise that they haven’t been paying much attention since Obama was inaugurated in January 2009, and/or the specter of a President Perry or President Romney “inspired” them to give money to Obama, even though he hasn’t delivered upon his much-hyped promises of “hope” and “change.”)

We see this in our daily lives: Those who go around burning people always have to obtain fresh victims to burn.

Only now that his re-election looks less likely over time has Obama promised to be the president that he’d promised us back in 2007 and 2008 that he’d be. He now promises, in his third year in office, to finally do something significant about unemployment and he now promises to make the rich and the super-rich pay their fair share of taxes, even though it was only in December that he allowed the Bush tax cuts for the rich and the super-rich to continue for another two years, violating yet another of his campaign promises.

Meh. I don’t believe him. I don’t believe that Obama would do much more, if anything more, in a second term than he has done thus far.

I think that he’d say anything to get re-elected, but the millions of us who haven’t given him another penny since the 2008 cycle — yes, that includes me — recognize his false promises as the false promises that they are.

Obama’s only hope for re-election that I can see is that the fear of a President Perry or a President Romney “inspires” former supporters to pony up and/or to vote for him again.

But that’s not a strong re-election slogan: “Re-elect Barack Obama: He’s Not As Bad As the Other Guy.”*

I surmise that more people voted against George W. Bush in 2004 than who voted for John Kerry — that is, their fear of a second term of the unelected Bush regime was greater than was their enthusiasm for Kerry.

The calcified (well, calcified except where it needs to be calcified: its spine) Democratic Party establishment sorely needs to go back to the drawing board and ask itself if it wants to return, ever, to the progressive policies and the willingness to fight tooth and nail for those policies, as was the case for the party’s leaders in the distant past, or whether it is safe for the party’s continued existence for its leaders to continue to believe that it’s enough to only continue to point out to the voters that the Repugnican (Tea) Party candidate is even worse than is the Democratic candidate.

I, for one, am willing to suffer through another Repugnican presidency if that would mean that the Democratic Party finally got its fucking shit together and stopped expecting us to expect nothing in return for our money and our votes.

But I don’t think that I’m alone. Apparently, thus far, anyway, at least a few million others are with me.

*If you think that I’m exaggerating, you should read this Associated Press news article from today:

Seattle — President Barack Obama charged [today] that the GOP vision of government would “fundamentally cripple America,” as he tried out his newly combative message on the liberal West Coast.

Aiming to renew the ardor of Democratic loyalists who have grown increasingly disenchanted with him, the president mixed frontal attacks on Republicans with words of encouragement intended to buck up the faithful as the 2012 campaign revs up.

“From the moment I took office what we’ve seen is a constant ideological pushback against any kind of sensible reforms that would make our economy work better and give people more opportunity,” the president said at an intimate brunch fundraiser at the Medina, Wash., home of former Microsoft executive Jon Shirley.

About 65 guests were paying $35,800 per couple to listen to Obama at the first of seven fundraisers he was holding from Seattle to Hollywood to San Diego [today and tomorrow]. The three-day West Coast swing, ending Tuesday in Denver, offered him the chance to re-engage with some of his most liberal and deep-pocketed supporters. … [Entire article is here.]

This really does appear to be Obama’s “argument” for re-election: “If you think that I’m bad…”

That’s an incredibly weak, deeply uninspiring talking point.

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Obama already relegated to mediocrity

At a time when our public-school teachers are getting pink slips, our “representative” government in Washington has given the war profiteers about $1 billion thus far via the Obama administration’s bullshit U.S. military action in Libya.

U.S. Rep. Dennis Kucinich, who I would support over Barack Obama in 2012, according to The Associated Press “said he would offer an amendment to the next budget resolution that would prohibit taxpayer dollars from being used to fund U.S. military operations in Libya.”

The AP notes that “His effort could gain significant congressional support, including the backing of tea partiers, if the U.S. military operation is going full-bore when lawmakers return from their recess next week.”

“We have already spent trillions of dollars on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, both of which descended into unwinnable quagmires,” the AP reports Kucinich wrote his colleagues. “Now, the president is plunging the United States into yet another war we cannot afford.”

If the “tea partiers” are on board with reining in the continued looting of the U.S. Treasury via the bloated military-industrial complex, especially during a time when we’re told that we can’t afford to attend to actual human needs, then, while I diametrically disagree with them on the majority of the issues, I certainly can partner with them in that.

And I agree wholeheartedly that the Nobel Peace Prize that was awarded to Obama ridiculously early in 2009 should be revoked. Bolivia’s president, Evo Morales, and others have made the call to take the ill-awarded prize back.

Ralph Nader’s statement — and Kucinich’s, too — that Obama’s having launched a military attack on Libya without the consent of the U.S. Congress is unconstitutional and impeachable is spot-on. While I don’t expect Obama to be impeached — yet — the fact that George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and other war criminals and traitors remain at large instead of being excecuted for their treason and their crimes against humanity, including mass murder, doesn’t mean that the arrogant Obama — who excels only at breaking campaign promises — gets to continue the imperial, unaccountable, above-the-law presidency that the unelected Bush regime began.

Having shit and pissed upon his base for the past two years, it will be interesting to see the change in the percentage of Obama’s campaign contributions that have come from individuals versus corporations from his 2008 presidential campaign to his 2012 re-election campaign.

While Yahoo! News reports that “Obama raised $59 million for his presidential campaign during the first half of 2007,” and that “Obama’s prospective GOP challengers would have to raise $590,000 a day between now and June 30 to match that pace during this campaign,” this seems to assume that the same level of enthusiasm for Obama that existed in 2007 exists now.

Corporations might be enthusiastic about Obama, but progressive individuals like me? I surmise that millions of us progressives who gave him campaign contributions for his 2008 run — based upon his blatantly false promises of “hope” and “change” — won’t give him a fucking rent cent for his 2012 campaign. I certainly won’t. So I surmise that the only way that he’ll be able to match his 2008 take is if he is able to make up for the loss in his base through getting bribes — er, campaign contributions — from his biggest benefactors, the corporations.

Realistically, Obama probably will be elected to a second lackluster presidential term. I could see an impeachment attempt against him in the future, probably a Bill-Clinton-like bullshit impeachment attempt by the right, but perhaps, just perhaps, even a justified impeachment attempt from the left.

What opportunity Obama had — but squandered. With popular opinion on his side and both houses of Congress controlled by his party for two years, Obama did diddly squat.

He could have been a great president. Instead, he already has joined the pantheon of mediocre U.S. presidents.

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