Tell your ‘super-delegates’ that voting against the people is a deal breaker

If Billary Clinton wins the 2016 Democratic Party presidential nomination democratically — that is, if she legitimately wins the majority of the votes in the primary elections and caucuses — then I’ll accept that result.

That doesn’t mean that I’d vote for her in November — because I very most likely would not — but I do accept the results of fair elections.

The 2000 presidential election, for instance — I never have accepted and never will accept that result. Al Gore won the popular vote by more than a half-million votes, and there is no way in hell that George W. Bush would have “won” the 2000 presidential election were it not for his brother Jeb! having been governor of the pivotal state of Florida, then-Repugnican Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris (as the state’s chief elections official) having been co-chair of the effort to elect Gee Dubya in Florida (no conflict of interest there!), and finally, the right-wing U.S. Supreme Court having shut the whole thing down and by so doing declaring Gee Dubya the “winner.”

I was at a “Not My President’s Day” rally at the California state Capitol in February 2001, replete with my homemade sign declaring that “George Dubious Bush” was “not my president!” (I would return to the state Capitol not too terribly long after that to protest the unelected Bush regime’s looming illegal, immoral, unjust and unprovoked — and thus treasonous — Vietraq War.)

All of that said, I didn’t vote for Al Gore, but I voted for Green Party presidential candidate Ralph Nader in November 2000. (Hold your ammo. Of course Al Gore won all of California’s electoral votes, so no, because the U.S. president is selected by the Electoral College and not by the popular vote [as it should be], my vote for Nader, which I do not regret [the charisma-free Gore didn’t even win his home state of Tennessee, but the Democratic Party hacks blame Nader voters], did not help Gee Dubya.)

But the fact that I hadn’t voted for Gore in November 2000 didn’t make me any less outraged that the presidential election was stolen by the treasonous Repugnicans, who just wanted the White House, regardless of the clearly expressed will of the American people (again, Gore had won the popular vote by more than 500,000 votes; Gee Dubya became president only through the anti-democratic Electoral College [with his theft of Florida], which must be eliminated).

Similarly, while I don’t support Billary Clinton whatsoever — and the more the Billarybots attack, the less likely I am ever to support her (the Billarybots don’t successfully shame me into supporting their ethics-free candidate, but only reinforce my beliefs about their craven candidate) — I am not a sore loser, and so I accept it if my candidate of choice doesn’t win, as long as that loss happens fairly and squarely.

So, being a lover of democracy, the blatantly anti-democratic calls of the Billarybots for Bernie Sanders to drop out of the race have enraged me. (Thankfully, as it has become clearer to the anti-democratic Democrats in name only that Sanders isn’t going to drop out before there is a clear winner who has earned the win, they’ve eased up a bit on their calls for Bernie to exit prematurely for their convenience.)

Where we stand now with the estimated pledged (that is, actually [more-or-less] democratically earned) delegate count is Billary with 1,266 and Bernie with 1,038. That means that of the democratically earned delegates (delegates earned in primary elections and caucuses), thus far it’s Billary with 54.9 percent to Bernie with 45.1 percent, a difference of 9.8 percent.

As I’ve said before, for a “fringe” candidate, Bernie is doing pretty fucking well, and for a supposedly universally beloved candidate, and for a candidate who pretty much has been running for the White House at least since 2000, when she carpetbaggingly ran for the U.S. Senate for the state of New York, Billary is not doing nearly as well as she should be doing within her own fucking party for the candidate for whom the Billarybots are saying we should just shut up and crown already.

Again, the magic number of delegates to win the 2016 Democratic Party presidential nomination is 2,383. Billary is “only” 1,117 delegates away from that, but we’re just supposed to coronate her already. Why make a dynastic member of royalty earn it?

If the battle for delegates goes to the Democratic Party convention, so be it. That would be called democracy.

Billary can’t actually get any of her “super-delegates” — the anti-democratic delegates (the [vast] majority of them apparently Democratic Party hacks who fall in line rather than vote their conscience, since, being party hacks, they have no conscience, but are only part of the hive mind) — until the party convention this summer. We can talk until we’re blue in the face about Billary’s “super-delegates,” but for today, since the hive-mind delegates can’t vote until late July, Billary has only 1,266 delegates.

How many of the “super-delegates” Bernie Sanders can win from Billary is an unknown (the “super-delegates” may say that they’re going to support one candidate but then vote for another candidate at the actual convention), but I can say two things today:

One, as I’ve already noted, the Democratic Party needs to follow the lead of the Repugnican Tea Party and force its “super-delegates” to vote with the people. (That said, as I’ve noted before, forcing the “super-delegates” to vote with the people makes the “super-delegates” redundant, and therefore, “super-delegates” need to be eliminated altogether in both parties. Any system in which the popular vote could be subverted needs to go. That would include the Electoral College, too, of course.)

Two, again, I can accept it when my chosen candidate doesn’t win an election that was conducted fairly and squarely, but anti-democratic bullshit I cannot stand.

Therefore, should Bernie Sanders win my congressional district in California’s presidential primary election on June 7 and my member of the U.S. House of Representatives, Democrat Doris Matsui, as a “super-delegate,” vote for Billary Clinton at the convention, I won’t cast a vote for Matsui ever again.

(I am assuming here, of course, that after the “super-delegates” vote, how they voted will be released publicly. I refused to vote for Matsui for years but then did vote for her in November 2014, since at least at that time she had been on the right side of many issues, but, again, if Bernie wins my congressional district and she actually votes against that as a “super-delegate,” I won’t vote for her ever again.)

I never vote for the center-right DINO U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein anyway, who no doubt will cast her “super-delegate” vote for Billary even if Bernie wins California on June 7, because that’s just the kind of person Dianne Feinstein is. (If memory serves, I voted for Feinstein once, when I was new to California and didn’t know any better, but that was it. Once I got to know her, I was done with her.)

And Democratic U.S. Sen. Barbara Boxer isn’t running again in November, but hopefully she would cast her “super-delegate” vote for Bernie should he win California. It would be a shitty end to her long political career if she went against the will of the state’s voters at the convention this summer.

Unfortunately, per Wikipedia’s roundup of the “super-delegates,” my U.S. representative and both of my U.S. senators have indicated that they plan to vote for Billary at the convention.

My governor, Democrat Jerry Brown, as a “super-delegate” (per Wikipedia) remains “uncommitted” (he did run against Bill Clinton for the presidential nomination in 1992…). While Brown cannot run for a third term in November 2018, for the most part I expect him to cast his “super-delegate” vote for Bernie Sanders should Bernie win California. Jerry Brown is just that kind of guy (that is, democratic as well as Democratic).

I am going to send a letter (snail mail is more effective, I believe, than is e-mail) to my elected representatives encouraging them as “super-delegates” to vote with the people of California, and informing them, if they stand for re-election, that their voting against the will of the people as a “super-delegate” is a deal breaker for any future vote from me.

I encourage you to do the same; the list of “super-delegates” (and how they have indicated they intend to cast their vote) is here, and a simple Google search will give you your “super-delegates'” contact information.

The Democratic Party, if it is to survive, must be a democratic party as well.

P.S. The next two big contests are Wisconsin (86 pledged delegates), on Tuesday, and New York (247 pledged delegates), on April 19.

Real Clear Politics’ average of polls right now has Bernie up by 2.2 percent in Wisconsin and Billary up by 27 percent in New York. However, The Huffington Post’s average of polls right now has Bernie up in Wisconsin by 4.6 percent and has Billary ahead in New York by just 12 percent and includes a graph that shows Bernie rising rapidly in the state:

So we’ll see.

If Bernie can’t win New York, I expect him to get a big chunk o’ delegates there anyway.

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