While Bernie surges, Billary slips below 50 percent nationally and in Iowa

Presidential aspirant U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders has work to do on becoming better known by more Americans, but more of those who know Sanders like him than dislike him. Billary “Coronate Me Already” Clinton, on the other hand, is quite well-known, but more than 50 percent of Americans dislike her. Yet we’re to believe that she’s the stronger general-election presidential candidate.

A third recent nationwide poll (I recently reported on the first two) has put Billary Clinton’s nationwide support among Democrats and Democratic leaners at below 50 percent — and has shown that such support for her dropped by 10 percentage points in just one month, from last month to this month.

And perhaps more devastatingly, a recent poll of likely Iowa caucus-goers also, for the first time, has put Billary at below 50 percent.

A Quinnipiac University poll taken August 20-25 put Billary’s support from her own party and its sympathizers at 45 percent nationally.

If 45 percent seems pretty good to you, note that a similar Quinnipiac University poll taken in April put Billary at 60 percent nationally. And the August 20-25 Quinnipiac University poll, like the other two recent nationwide polls that I wrote about earlier this month, also shows that Billary experienced a 10-point drop in support from just July to August; a July 23-28 Quinnipiac University poll had put Billary at 55 percent.

That’s three recent, independent nationwide polls whose results are quite close. The three polls have Billary’s nationwide support averaging at 47 percent, and Bernie Sander’s nationwide support averaging at 27 percent.

Democratic socialist Sanders wasn’t supposed to be doing this well against Queen Billary, who began running for president when her mother pushed her out 67 years ago.

That Billary’s support from those within her own party plummeted 10 points in just the past month demonstrates that the more people hear about her and get to know her, the less they like her. And we have more than five full months to go before the first-in-the-nation states of Iowa and New Hampshire hold their caucuses and primary election (on February 1 and on February 9, respectively).

Speaking of which, a Bloomberg Politics/Des Moines Register Iowa Poll released yesterday shows that Billary has the support of only 37 percent of likely Iowa caucus-goers — the first time that Billary’s support has been below 50 percent in the poll — and that Bernie Sanders is right on her heels, with the support of 30 percent of likely caucus-goers. (In May, Billary was at 57 percent in the poll and Sanders was at only 16 percent.)

Bloomberg News reports: “‘It looks like what people call the era of inevitability is over,’ said J. Ann Selzer, president of West Des Moines, Iowa-based Selzer & Co., which conducted the poll. ‘She has lost a third of the support that she had in May, so any time you lose that much that quickly, it’s a wake-up call.'”

But Billary won’t wake up.

Instead, she’s giving us a repeat performance of her doomed 2008 bid for the Democratic Party presidential nomination, when she acted like the cocky hare who already had it in the bag and thus lost to the slow-and-steady-wins-the-race, tortoise-like Team Obama.

Billary has tried to assure the Demo-rats who are fleeing the sinking USS Billary — which awfully resembles the RMS Titanicthat she essentially has won already, before a single caucus has been held or a single primary election ballot has been cast, because of the “superdelegate” commitments that she already has (never mind that those too-early commitments easily can be broken — and that they would be, that they would evaporate after it were clear that the voters don’t want Hillary after all).

With Bernie Sanders within striking distance of Billary in Iowa (given that the caucuses are more than five full months away) according to the latest poll, and with him already beating Billary in the latest poll of likely New Hampshire primary voters (by 7 percentage points*), I expect Bernie to win New Hampshire and quite possibly Iowa, too.

I don’t see Billary recovering from losing both Iowa and New Hampshire to party outsider and democratic socialist Bernie Sanders. (He always has caucused with the Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives and in the U.S. Senate, so he’s not entirely an outsider, but still, compared to the center-right Clintons, who with their political machine turned the Democratic Party into the Repugnican Lite Party, he very much is an outsider.)

We saw what Billary did in 2008 when she was losing to upstart and political rock star Barack Obama and increasingly was desperate: She bolted to the right, dubbing Obama an “out-of-touch” “elitist.” But this Clintonesque triangulation bullshit hurt her more than it helped her — obviously, since Obama beat her — as those who participate in caucuses and primary elections (a.k.a. your base) aren’t the centrist fucktards to whom the Clinton Dynasty always has tried to appeal.

I see Billary & Co. savaging Bernie Sanders especially should he win both Iowa and New Hampshire, and Team Billary’s attacks on Sanders would make Billary even more loathed than she already is.

Especially since Bernie Sanders decided early on not to attack DINO Billary Clinton** — although he has plenty of material with which to do so — Team Billary’s attacks on Bernie would backfire big-time.

When someone who already is not well-liked (two recent nationwide polls put Billary’s unfavorability among all Americans at more than 50 percent and her nationwide favorability well below 50 percent) savages someone who has not savaged anyone else and who generally is liked, it usually doesn’t work out very well for the attacker.***

*Sanders beat Billary in the last three polls of New Hampshirites, with a 7-percent lead over Billary in the last two polls.

**My best guess, and my understanding, is that it’s Bernie Sanders’ personality and personal belief system that prevent him from attacking Billary, and while I personally have questioned whether or not it’s politically wise for him not to attack Billary, my best guess is that in the end his political pacifism will have helped him politically much more than it will have harmed him.

In short, he knows what he is doing, as evidenced by the fact that what he is doing is working; he surges on.

***Bernie Sanders’ favorability ratings in two recent nationwide polls show that, unlike is the case with Billary, more like him than not, but that many don’t know him well enough to have an opinion of him.

He has a lot of work to do on that (we have a lot of work to do on that), to be sure, but it’s better to be like Sanders (unknown by many Americans but liked by a majority of those who do know you) than it is to be like Billary: quite-well-known and disliked by a majority of Americans.

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