Why the messianic complex?

 

If President Obama isn’t the former one, he’s at least the latter one — right?

Why do even otherwise intelligent people regard Barack Obama as some kind of a messiah?

How do they find it so easy to dismiss those aspects of Obama’s words and actions that aren’t in line with the messiah storyline? How do even self-defined liberals or progressives continue to delude themselves into believing that Obama is a liberal or a progressive?

When facts don’t sway someone, it points to a deep psychological need to believe whatever one wishes to believe, regardless of the facts.

Oh, Barack Obama strikes me as a decent-enough man. He probably wants to live up to his rhetoric. But correctly identifying the goal doesn’t mean that you have attained the goal any more than correctly finding a place on a map means that you have traveled to that place.

Obama has demonstrated, time and again, such as with the same-sex marriage and religion issues, that he will say and do whatever he and his advisers believe he needs to say and do in order to win an election. “Team of rivals”? No, Obama surrounds himself with a team of political calculators.   

Part of me could argue that political calculation is a necessary evil if you want to win a huge election such as that for the presidency.

But another, larger part of me screams: “Sellout!”

Centrism, however necessary it might actually be to win big elections, is for sissies. It’s for those who don’t want to pick a side of an issue and who want to try to please everyone. Centrism — which comes under other names, too, such as “bipartisanship” — is touted as the level-headed response to extremism, when, in fact, it’s usually the product of mental and moral laziness, selfishness and intentional ignorance. It’s far easier to assert that nothing really matters or that it’s all the same anyway than to carefully examine an issue and then, after such careful examination, make a principled stand. As much as I detest the wingnuts, at least they are committed (and should be committed…).

Obama won the election because he appealed to enough centrists and because he fooled enough liberals and progressives that he’s one of them. The formula worked, and thus far, Obama appears to intend to stick to the tried-and-true formula.

Why the Obama-related messianic complex?

By “messianic complex” I refer, probably incorrectly, to the making of Barack Obama into some sort of a messiah by the American masses, not to Obama making himself into a messiah, although, of course, while he might eschew that he’s a messiah, were the subject brought up to him directly, Obama isn’t exactly trying to dissuade the masses from any grandiose ideas that they have about him.

He has, in fact, quite intentionally compared himself to Abraham Lincoln, if not to Jesus Christ.

So Obama gets the benefit of being thought of as a messiah while being able, at least in his own mind, to deny that he has done anything to foster such an image of him. It’s a lot like how people want to act like a bitch but don’t want to be thought of as a bitch.

Why the messianic complex, then?

One need look only at how the American masses put everything into George W. Bush after Sept. 11, 2001.

Many if not most Americans knew that invading Iraq in March 2003 out of some sort of retaliation for the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, was bullshit. I knew that it was bullshit just from listening to the news on NPR and reading the news on the Internet (The Associated Press and Reuters, I mean, not moonbats.com or the like); it was clear to me, as only a news consumer, that the unelected Bush regime was hellbent on invading Iraq no matter fucking what, and that the non-existent weapons of mass destruction or intention of Iraq to develop them was only a pretext. Which was why I attended a protest rally at the California State Capitol — one of several anti-war rallies across the nation — the month before the Bush regime launched its Vietraq War.

But Americans apparently figured that any karmic guilt that they might have over the bullshit invasion and occupation of Iraq could be put onto the Bush regime. Even though a sizeable majority of Americans supported the March 2003 invasion of Iraq — Wikipedia puts the American support of the invasion of Iraq around 60-something percent at the time right before and right after the invasion — now, 60-something percent of Americans call the invasion of Iraq a mistake, believe that the invasion wasn’t worth it. (It was worth it to Dick Cheney’s Halliburton and the other war-profiteering subsidiaries of BushCheneyCorp!)

Will Americans, as a nation, ever apologize to the world or to Iraq for having allowed the Bush regime first to steal a presidential election and then to launch the bogus Vietaq War?

Of course not; being an American means never having to say that you are sorry, and believing that if you simply never acknowledge your wrongdoings, then you never committed those wrongdoings in the first place. (If a tree falls in a forest…?)

Having elected Barack Obama, I suspect, is about as close to an apology from the American people that Iraq or the world is ever going to get.

And fuck, I could argue that Obama’s election wasn’t even anything even like an indirect national apology, but was the result only of the inarguably inescapable corruption and ineptitude of the Bush regime. I mean, after the Bush regime’s bungling of the federal response to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, there was nothing to argue about anymore, and it was pretty fucking clear that we were just going to have to keep marking days off on the calendar until the Bush regime was termed out.

What I really want to get at is that Americans are like children who refuse to take responsibility for their own actions or inactions. They put everything on to a Santa Claus-like figure known as The President of the United States. Even though anyone who was paying attention knew that the Bush regime had no good reason to invade Iraq, Americans were hellbent on getting revenge for 9/11, even though 15 of the 19 9/11 hijackers were from Saudi Arabia and not one of them was from Iraq. (Really, had we wanted revenge for 9/11, we’d much more logically have invaded and occupied Saudi Arabia, but we love Saudi Arabia because its monarchy oppresses the Saudi people so that Americans can continue to have a steady flow of oil. While we Americans assert how vital it is to democratize the Middle East, Saudi Arabia for some reason gets a pass from us.)

The Bush regime, which wanted to invade Iraq even before they stole office, knew that they could harness the national outrage over 9/11 into a “retaliatory” attack upon Iraq. They knew that they could lead the revenge-thirsty American sheeple off that cliff and they did so.

Americans, embarrassed that they got punk’d, that the mission in Iraq still has not been accomplished (well, the real mission — war profiteeringhas been accomplished), just want to forget that at one time about two-thirds of them supported the Iraq misadventure. And because the Vietraq War wasn’t exactly the cakewalk that the Bush regime had promised that it would be, Americans think that they can wash their hands of the blood of thousands and thousands of innocent Iraqi civilians by blaming it all on Bush — even though their support of Bush made it all possible. 

Of course, I could argue that had the Iraqis just rolled over and played dead and been “democratized” and “liberated” by the benificent Americans like good little sand monkeys should, the majority of Americans now would be saying that the Vietraq War was a swell idea, because there is no such thing as right or wrong, but there is only winning or losing, and if you win, of course you were right.

But the Iraqis proved to be like the Vietnamese; they fought back against the illegal, immoral, unjust and unprovoked invasion and subsequent occupation of their nation. Who knew?

So the election of Barack Obama is the closest that we’re probably ever going to get from the American people to some sort of national “You know, that whole Iraq thing — my bad!”

And so now Americans, who were asleep at the wheel when the Bush regime first stole office and then launched the bogus Vietraq War, now want Barack Obama to pull our national car out of the ditch like Obama is Superman. Just plastering Obama’s visage and the slogans of “hope” and “change” everyfuckingwhere should be enough, right? That’s an awful lot easier than actually changing our ways and rolling up our sleeves, isn’t it, to expect one man to do it all for us? If Barack Obama isn’t actually a messiah or Santa Claus, he’s at least the reincarnation of Abraham Lincoln.

And if things don’t magically get better under his watch without our collectively having lifted a finger, we can just blame it on him. We can claim that we got punk’d yet once again.

It’s long past time for the American people to grow up.

Advertisements

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

2 responses to “Why the messianic complex?

  1. mountainguy

    This could be the first time someone who CLEARLY IS NOT a (evangelical) conservative criticizes Obama. Nice man, really nice (as a southamerican, I see Obama as much more decent than G. W. Bush, but it is still american imperialism)

  2. robertdcrook

    No, lots of progressives have plenty of criticisms of Obama.

    It’s no big feat to be more decent than is George W. Bush… As I’ve blogged, if George W. Bush is the new gold standard for the U.S. president, then the U.S. is rather royally fucked.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s